Terraforming your AWS Infrastructure

Using Terraform, learn how to transform your infrastructure into code and automate every step of the deployment process on AWS.

RabbitMQ Clustering on Ubuntu 14.04

Overview RabbitMQ is messaging service that allows you to queue and spread your data processing tasks to backend servers. For instance, this allows you to build a server cluster solely responsible for processing photo uploads (resizing, adding filters, saving to storage, etc). Each server in that cluster contacts the RabbitMQ cluster for new, unprocessed messages. […]

Access Apache Server Status with Permalinks Enabled

Operations teams and system administrators are always love having the ability to check the status of their servers. Apache allows us to easily peak under the covers by way of a virtual directory called, as you may have guessed, /server-status.

How to do URL Redirects with Nginx

Content rot has a tendency to creep up on you as a website or application ages. The last thing your visitors want when they reach your site after clicking a link is to be face planted with a 404 error. To make matters worse, too many 404s will have an impact on your search engine site rankings.

We can battle 404s with redirect rules written in our Nginx configurations. The rules can either suggest to the web browser, search engine and anything that the content has permanently moved, or we suggest the content has only moved temporarily. Either way, you have chance to guide the user to the new location of your content in transparent manner.

How to Configure Logrotate

It’s always important to keep your server logs around for as long as it makes business sense. You’ll need them for auditing system access, discovering abuses, or to identify root causes to problems, among other reasons. The challenge, though, is that depending on the service being provided and the amount of traffic received, your logs are capable of growing to gargantuan sizes, consuming every last bit of disk space available.

Logrotate allows us to better manage our logs to prevent from consuming too much disk space. Depending on the schedule you decide on, your logs can be rotated every day, week, or month. Each rotation renames your existing log file, usually by appending a ‘.’ and number to the end, and then creates a new file. To preserve storage the logs that have been rotated can be compressed using Gzip.

How to Create MongoDB Replication Clusters

Unlike relation database servers, scaling NoSQL databases to meet increased demand on your application is fairly simple – you drop in a new server, make a couple of config changes, and it connects to your existing servers, enlarging the cluster. All existing databases and collections are automatically replicated and synced with the other member nodes.

A replication cluster works well when the entire data volume of your database(s) is able to fit onto a single server. Each server in your replication cluster will host a full copy of your databases.

How to Create a MySQL Master Slave Cluster on Ubuntu 14

Improve application performance and availability by learning how to create a MySQL Master\Slave cluster on Ubuntu 14

Install and Configure MongoDB on Ubuntu 14

MongoDB is one of the most popular open source NoSQL database solutions available. Unlike relational databases that store rows of data, document oriented databases like this one store data as, you guessed it, documents. These types of databases are not constricted by rigid schemas. They also scale much easier and more efficiently than relational databases, meaning it is a lot easier to store once unthinkable amounts of application data.

MongoDB is able to achieve and maintain high performance – much greater than any relational database, such as Microsoft SQL – even while storing petabytes of data by offloading a lot of logic to your application. A relational database it is not, but this trade off gives are developers the flexibility they need to work with data in today’s high volume, big data world.

The tutorial will guide you through the installation through to managing your databases.

How to Remove a Failed Active Directory Domain Controller

When a domain controller in your environment goes down hard and cannot be brought back online, you may need to forcefully demote it from its Active Directory domain. The following step-by-step will walk you through safely demoting a domain controller that cannot be brought back online.

© 2014 Shane Rainville